May 21, 2024

Columbus Post

Complete News World

Turkey: Kemal Kilicdaroglu is known as Recep Tayyip Erdogan Heras

Turkey: Kemal Kilicdaroglu is known as Recep Tayyip Erdogan Heras

Kemal Kilicdaroglu

“We will eliminate him” – this is the man who wants to take down Erdogan

Turkey’s presidential election on Sunday promises to be more exciting than it has been in a long time. After 20 years, Kemal Kilicdaroglu may replace Recep Tayyip Erdogan as president.

Updated

Kemal Kilicdaroglu (74) is the leader of the social-democratic CHP and the candidate of the six-party coalition.

IMAGO/Depot photos

  • Kemal Kilicdaroglu is given a good chance to win the Turkish presidential election.

  • He wants to send incumbent Erdogan “to a democratic retirement.”

  • In an interview, Erdogan vowed to accept a possible election defeat.

Strengthening democracy, fighting inflation and corruption and a strict immigration policy – this is what opposition leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu (74) advertises. He presents himself as A counter-proposal for recipe sewing Erdoğan: Election campaign videos from a simple kitchen instead of a quiet appearance, inauguration of big projects.

Klikdaroglu is not a new face to the Turks either. He has been the leader of the main opposition CHP for 13 years, but has yet to win any national elections. His candidacy was initially controversial. Both Local Government Election 2019 Two decades later, the opposition succeeded in wresting the key cities of Istanbul and Ankara from the government. Kilikdaroğlu is also a success thanks to clever alliances.

See also  Farewell to Benedict XVI: His last words on his deathbed - the first photo since his death

He wants to abolish the presidential system

Kilicdaroglu now unites six parties from different camps: from nationalist to conservative and ultra-religious to his own secular center-left party, the CHP. He is also supported by the pro-leftist Kurdish HDP, which is seen as a kingmaker. All want to abolish the presidential system and return Turkey to a parliamentary democracy.

Kilicdaroglu was born in Tunceli in eastern Turkey and belongs to the Alevi religious minority. He worked as an officer in the civil service. The image of a colorless bureaucrat still hangs over him. Now you have a good chance to improve your profile and win. The man who wants to replace Erdogan, who has been in power for 20 years, told German news magazine Stern in an interview: “We will get rid of him and retire democratically.” Erdoğan knows it well, Kilicdaroğlu said confidently.

“Don’t take your eyes off the ballot box”

In an interview broadcast on several Turkish television channels on Friday, Erdogan vowed to accept a possible election defeat. Asked what he would do in the event of defeat, Erdogan initially responded that it was “a very stupid question.” He added: “We came to power democratically and with the support of our people: if our country decides differently, we will do what democracy demands. There is nothing else to do.”

Meanwhile, opposition leader Kilicdaroglu has appealed to his supporters not to take their eyes off the ballot boxes. “Never give up and never leave your post,” he said in a video shared on Twitter. There were threats against election workers, he said without elaborating. Recently the election campaign has heated up. A prominent opposition politician was pelted with stones last Sunday, injuring many.

See also  The giant yacht that sank was owned by Russian oligarch Gennady Ayvasyan

Polls point to a neck-and-neck race between Erdogan and his challenger.

Are you interested in political events in the country beyond the Federal Council elections and votes? Want to read exciting interviews, analysis and even fun stuff about current topics? Subscribe to policy push here (works in app only)!

This is done like this: Install the latest version of the 20-minute app. Tap “Cockpit” in the bottom right, then the “Settings” cog and finally “Push Notifications.” Tap “Politics” under “Topics” – and it’s on.

Stay up-to-date on your favorite topics and never miss news on current world events with daily updates.
Get the most important information direct to your inbox every day.

(DPA/AFP/Work)See comments